Anti Cimex

Anti Cimex were a Swedish hardcore punk band, based in Skövde, Göteborg, Linköping, and Malmö, at different times, that formed in 1981.[1] They were one of the first bands to define Scandinavian hardcore punk. Their second 7″, Raped Ass, is considered to be a subgenre-defining D-beat record. Scene historian Peter Jandreus describes the group as the most famous Swedish punk band of the 1977-87 era.[1]

Their name is taken from the Swedish pest control company with the same name, the name of this company, in turn, comes from the Latin name of a particular type of bedbug; Cimex.

Lightnin’ Hopkins

Sam John Hopkins (March 15, 1912 – January 30, 1982) better known as Lightnin’ Hopkins, was an American country blues singer, songwriter, guitarist and occasional pianist, from Houston, Texas. Rolling Stone magazine included Hopkins at number 71 on their list of the 100 greatest guitarists of all time.

Robert “Mack” McCormick stated, “Hopkins is the embodiment of the jazz-and-poetry spirit, representing its ancient form in the single creator whose words and music are one act”.

Born Sam John Hopkins in Centerville, Texas,[4] Hopkins’ childhood was immersed in the sounds of the blues and he developed a deeper appreciation at the age of 8 when he met Blind Lemon Jefferson at a church picnic in Buffalo, Texas.That day, Hopkins felt the blues was “in him” and went on to learn from his older (somewhat distant) cousin, country blues singer Alger “Texas” Alexander.[1] Hopkins had another cousin, the Texas electric blues guitarist, Frankie Lee Sims, with whom he later recorded. Hopkins began accompanying Blind Lemon Jefferson on guitar in informal church gatherings. Jefferson supposedly never let anyone play with him except for young Hopkins, who learned much from and was influenced greatly by Blind Lemon Jefferson thanks to these gatherings. In the mid 1930s, Hopkins was sent to Houston County Prison Farm for an unknown offense.In the late 1930s Hopkins moved to Houston with Alexander in an unsuccessful attempt to break into the music scene there. By the early 1940s he was back in Centerville working as a farm hand

Paul Jones

Paul Jones (born Paul Pond, 24 February 1942, Portsmouth, England)[1] is an English singer, actor, harmonica player, and radio personality and television presenter.

As “P.P. Pond”, Paul Jones performed duets with Elmo Lewis (aka future founder member of the Rolling Stones, Brian Jones) at the Ealing Club, home of Alexis Korner‘s Blues Incorporated, whose singers included Long John Baldry and Mick Jagger. He was asked by Keith Richards and Brian Jones to be the lead singer of a group they were forming, but he turned them down.[2] Jones then went on to be the vocalist and harmonica player of the successful 1960s group Manfred Mann.[1] He had several Top Ten hits with Manfred Mann before going solo in July 1966.He remained with His Master’s Voice.[3]

He was less successful without the band than they were with his replacement, but did have a few hits, notably with “High Time” (1966) and “I’ve Been a Bad, Bad Boy” and “Thinkin’ Ain’t for Me” (both 1967) before attempting to branch into acting.[1] While his solo recording career was barely successful in the UK,it never got off the ground in the US. He did have enough hits in Sweden however to have a greatest hits album released there on EMI.

His performance opposite model Jean Shrimpton in the 1967 film Privilege, directed by Peter Watkins, did not bring the hoped-for stardom, although the film later became a cult classic. Privilege, which unsurprisingly cast Jones as a pop singer, saw him sing a few songs, including “Set Me Free”, which was covered by Patti Smith in the mid 1970s.

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